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27.10.15

Roman Art - CAMEO WITH THE HEAD OF ATHENA


CAMEO CON BUSTO DI ATHENACAMEO CON BUSTO DI ATHENACAMEO CON BUSTO DI ATHENACAMEO CON BUSTO DI ATHENA
I century B.C.-I century A.D. A chalcedony oval cameo with the head of the goddess Athena in profile to the right, wearing the Corinthian helmet over his head.
Cameo is a method of carving an object such as an engraved gem, item of jewellery or vessel made in this manner. It nearly always features a raised (positive) relief image; contrast with intaglio, which has a negative image. Originally, and still in discussing historical work, cameo only referred to works where the relief image was of a contrasting colour to the background; this was achieved by carefully carving a piece of material with a flat plane where two contrasting colours met, removing all the first colour except for the image to leave a contrasting background. Cameos are often worn as jewelry, but in ancient times were mainly used for signet rings and large earrings, although the largest examples were probably too large for this, and were just admired as objets d'art. Stone cameos of great artistry were made in Greece dating back as far as the 3rd century BC. The Farnese Tazza (a cup) is the oldest major Hellenistic piece surviving. They were very popular in Ancient Rome, especially in the family circle of Augustus. The most famous stone "state cameos" from this period are the Gemma Augustea, the Gemma Claudia made for the Emperor Claudius, and the largest flat engraved gem known from antiquity, the Great Cameo of France. Roman Cameos became less common around in the years leading up to 300 AD.
Cod. 120/2014          


Year: 100 a.C.-100 d.C.
Dimension: Higth 2,4 cm
Note:




» Euro 1.500,00

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